APOD: The Road and the Milky Way (2022 Jun 11)

Comments and questions about the APOD on the main view screen.
User avatar
APOD Robot
Otto Posterman
Posts: 4738
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 3:27 am

APOD: The Road and the Milky Way (2022 Jun 11)

Post by APOD Robot » Sat Jun 11, 2022 4:06 am

Image The Road and the Milky Way

Explanation: At night you can follow this road as it passes through the Dark Sky Alqueva reserve not too far from Alentejo, Portugal. Or you could stop, look up, and follow the Milky Way through the sky. Both stretch from horizon to horizon in this 180 degree panorama recorded on June 3. Our galaxy's name, the Milky Way, does refer to its appearance as a milky path in the sky. The word galaxy itself derives from the Greek for milk. From our fair planet the arc of the Milky Way is most easily visible on moonless nights from dark sky areas, though not quite so bright or colorful as in this image. The glowing celestial band is due to the collective light of myriad stars along the galactic plane too faint to be distinguished individually. The diffuse starlight is cut by dark swaths of the galaxy's obscuring interstellar dust clouds. Standing above the Milky Way arc near the top of this panoramic nightscape is bright star Vega, with the galaxy's central bulge near the horizon at the right.

<< Previous APOD This Day in APOD Next APOD >>

User avatar
orin stepanek
Plutopian
Posts: 7672
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 3:41 pm
Location: Nebraska

Re: APOD: The Road and the Milky Way (2022 Jun 11)

Post by orin stepanek » Sat Jun 11, 2022 1:34 pm

MilkyWayArchCumeada-fb1200.jpg
At first I thought there was a sharp bend in the road; till I saw it was
a horizon to horizon photo!
APOD, though not quite so bright or colorful as in this image
I remember as a boy looking at the Milky Way; it was looking Quite
bright, but there was hardly any light polution way back then! :mrgreen:
2022-June-AM-Planets-smaller-text.jpg
Probably would be difficult to see Mercury; but should be nice
sighting of Venus! 8-)
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

User avatar
VictorBorun
Commander
Posts: 571
Joined: Fri Oct 16, 2020 10:25 pm

Re: APOD: The Road and the Milky Way (2022 Jun 11)

Post by VictorBorun » Sat Jun 11, 2022 3:52 pm

Vega but no Deneb?

User avatar
alter-ego
Serendipitous Sleuthhound
Posts: 1056
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 4:51 am
Location: Redmond, WA

Re: APOD: The Road and the Milky Way (2022 Jun 11)

Post by alter-ego » Sat Jun 11, 2022 4:12 pm

VictorBorun wrote: Sat Jun 11, 2022 3:52 pm Vega but no Deneb?
Vega is the "star" attraction here.
A pessimist is nothing more than an experienced optimist

User avatar
johnnydeep
Captain
Posts: 1412
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2011 8:57 pm

Re: APOD: The Road and the Milky Way (2022 Jun 11)

Post by johnnydeep » Sat Jun 11, 2022 4:16 pm

Man, my first search for "Dark Sky Alqueva reserve" in Bing put me about 1000 miles to the west off the coast of Portugal:

https://www.bing.com/maps?q=Dark+Sky+Al ... O-c9d0fc87

Oddly though, Bing still had the correct website address: https://darkskyalqueva.com

A google search got me to Portugal, and to what is apparently the correct place - https://goo.gl/maps/by8DQm3pKe2i4U6FA

I was trying to understand how the MW would look to someone standing on that road in the APOD. Zooming in on the google map leads me to believe the road is pretty straight - see https://goo.gl/maps/z1SkfQEEivN569Cq9 - but I'm still not sure how the arc of the MW would appear to a naked eye observer. I suffer from a failure of 3D imaging software.
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."

User avatar
alter-ego
Serendipitous Sleuthhound
Posts: 1056
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 4:51 am
Location: Redmond, WA

Re: APOD: The Road and the Milky Way (2022 Jun 11)

Post by alter-ego » Sat Jun 11, 2022 5:09 pm

johnnydeep wrote: Sat Jun 11, 2022 4:16 pm Man, my first search for "Dark Sky Alqueva reserve" in Bing put me about 1000 miles to the west off the coast of Portugal:

https://www.bing.com/maps?q=Dark+Sky+Al ... O-c9d0fc87

Oddly though, Bing still had the correct website address: https://darkskyalqueva.com

A google search got me to Portugal, and to what is apparently the correct place - https://goo.gl/maps/by8DQm3pKe2i4U6FA

I was trying to understand how the MW would look to someone standing on that road in the APOD. Zooming in on the google map leads me to believe the road is pretty straight - see https://goo.gl/maps/z1SkfQEEivN569Cq9 - but I'm still not sure how the arc of the MW would appear to a naked eye observer. I suffer from a failure of 3D imaging software.
It would appear straight and near the zenith. The Stellarium screenshot shows the fisheye view with a 360° horizon, and the horizontal coordinate system. The zenith is at the center. Of course, since the view below more closely replicates the APOD image, it too appears more colorful and brighter than you'd see with your eyes.
 
MW View.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
A pessimist is nothing more than an experienced optimist

User avatar
johnnydeep
Captain
Posts: 1412
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2011 8:57 pm

Re: APOD: The Road and the Milky Way (2022 Jun 11)

Post by johnnydeep » Sat Jun 11, 2022 7:47 pm

alter-ego wrote: Sat Jun 11, 2022 5:09 pm
johnnydeep wrote: Sat Jun 11, 2022 4:16 pm Man, my first search for "Dark Sky Alqueva reserve" in Bing put me about 1000 miles to the west off the coast of Portugal:

https://www.bing.com/maps?q=Dark+Sky+Al ... O-c9d0fc87

Oddly though, Bing still had the correct website address: https://darkskyalqueva.com

A google search got me to Portugal, and to what is apparently the correct place - https://goo.gl/maps/by8DQm3pKe2i4U6FA

I was trying to understand how the MW would look to someone standing on that road in the APOD. Zooming in on the google map leads me to believe the road is pretty straight - see https://goo.gl/maps/z1SkfQEEivN569Cq9 - but I'm still not sure how the arc of the MW would appear to a naked eye observer. I suffer from a failure of 3D imaging software.
It would appear straight and near the zenith. The Stellarium screenshot shows the fisheye view with a 360° horizon, and the horizontal coordinate system. The zenith is at the center. Of course, since the view below more closely replicates the APOD image, it too appears more colorful and brighter than you'd see with your eyes.
 
MW View.jpg
How you manage to do this stuff is amazing. So, if you assume the road is straight, how would it be oriented under this sky on your image?
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."

User avatar
johnnydeep
Captain
Posts: 1412
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2011 8:57 pm

Re: APOD: The Road and the Milky Way (2022 Jun 11)

Post by johnnydeep » Sat Jun 11, 2022 7:50 pm

alter-ego wrote: Sat Jun 11, 2022 4:12 pm
VictorBorun wrote: Sat Jun 11, 2022 3:52 pm Vega but no Deneb?
Vega is the "star" attraction here.
Using your labeled pic from above, I'd guess the other stars are here ... maybe (please ignore the black artifact I manage to put in the middle during "editing"):
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."

User avatar
alter-ego
Serendipitous Sleuthhound
Posts: 1056
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 4:51 am
Location: Redmond, WA

Re: APOD: The Road and the Milky Way (2022 Jun 11)

Post by alter-ego » Sun Jun 12, 2022 2:36 am

johnnydeep wrote: Sat Jun 11, 2022 7:47 pm
alter-ego wrote: Sat Jun 11, 2022 5:09 pm
johnnydeep wrote: Sat Jun 11, 2022 4:16 pm Man, my first search for "Dark Sky Alqueva reserve" in Bing put me about 1000 miles to the west off the coast of Portugal:

https://www.bing.com/maps?q=Dark+Sky+Al ... O-c9d0fc87

Oddly though, Bing still had the correct website address: https://darkskyalqueva.com

A google search got me to Portugal, and to what is apparently the correct place - https://goo.gl/maps/by8DQm3pKe2i4U6FA

I was trying to understand how the MW would look to someone standing on that road in the APOD. Zooming in on the google map leads me to believe the road is pretty straight - see https://goo.gl/maps/z1SkfQEEivN569Cq9 - but I'm still not sure how the arc of the MW would appear to a naked eye observer. I suffer from a failure of 3D imaging software.
It would appear straight and near the zenith. The Stellarium screenshot shows the fisheye view with a 360° horizon, and the horizontal coordinate system. The zenith is at the center. Of course, since the view below more closely replicates the APOD image, it too appears more colorful and brighter than you'd see with your eyes.
 
MW View.jpg
How you manage to do this stuff is amazing. So, if you assume the road is straight, how would it be oriented under this sky on your image?
Yeah, thanks. I do enjoy navigating through the morass of stars and galaxies. It'd be fun to try an intra-galactic, interactive navigation simulator where there'd be cosmic navigation landmarks and a few million stars to go to at mega-warp speeds! I'd love to have an option where I get dumped at some random position, then find my way home! Pretty trippy.
Yes, your star annotations are correct! Nice job! Those stars happen to be the three brightest stars in the APOD. Vega is #1.

Prior to your road placement question, I wanted to reorient my fish-eye view to the APOD view. Lo and behold, it looked way off. I quickly concluded the exposure timing(s) were earlier in the night. The APOD view is far from the zenith. Identifying Vega's altitude in the APOD put about 35° lower, and almost due east. I also identified an asterism just above the road to nail the southward heading direction.

Bottom line: The best I can ascertain, the road (middle of the APOD) heads almost due east, and makes about a 90° bend and then heads due south. Note, the MW will appear curved wrt the horizon.

A few things:
• It's difficult, or likely not possible, to draw straight-lines to demarcate the APOD image boundaries, so instead, I posted an oversized Stellarium view, including the zenith.
• I labeled Polaris as a reference. The APOD composite does not show Polaris as it's just beyond the left edge (5°) of the APOD, and about 15% down from the top edge. Also, most, it not all, of Cassiopeia is behind the tree at the base of the MW.
• Per David Cruz's imaging steps, the total sequenced exposure time was at least 30 minutes. The process of blending these images into the panorama logically introduces distortion that negates any standard projection simulations within Stellarium:
For this 180° panorama I went with 6 panels for the sky and 6 panels Foreground. For the Sky I shoot for each panel 5x1min tracked exposures to stack them and reduce noise. For the foreground I shoot each panel 4x30s untracked exposures. The sky and foreground were later blended together in editing.
 
MW View - Corrected.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
A pessimist is nothing more than an experienced optimist

User avatar
johnnydeep
Captain
Posts: 1412
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2011 8:57 pm

Re: APOD: The Road and the Milky Way (2022 Jun 11)

Post by johnnydeep » Sun Jun 12, 2022 1:59 pm

alter-ego wrote: Sun Jun 12, 2022 2:36 am
johnnydeep wrote: Sat Jun 11, 2022 7:47 pm
alter-ego wrote: Sat Jun 11, 2022 5:09 pm

It would appear straight and near the zenith. The Stellarium screenshot shows the fisheye view with a 360° horizon, and the horizontal coordinate system. The zenith is at the center. Of course, since the view below more closely replicates the APOD image, it too appears more colorful and brighter than you'd see with your eyes.
 
MW View.jpg
How you manage to do this stuff is amazing. So, if you assume the road is straight, how would it be oriented under this sky on your image?
Yeah, thanks. I do enjoy navigating through the morass of stars and galaxies. It'd be fun to try an intra-galactic, interactive navigation simulator where there'd be cosmic navigation landmarks and a few million stars to go to at mega-warp speeds! I'd love to have an option where I get dumped at some random position, then find my way home! Pretty trippy.
Yes, your star annotations are correct! Nice job! Those stars happen to be the three brightest stars in the APOD. Vega is #1.

Prior to your road placement question, I wanted to reorient my fish-eye view to the APOD view. Lo and behold, it looked way off. I quickly concluded the exposure timing(s) were earlier in the night. The APOD view is far from the zenith. Identifying Vega's altitude in the APOD put about 35° lower, and almost due east. I also identified an asterism just above the road to nail the southward heading direction.

Bottom line: The best I can ascertain, the road (middle of the APOD) heads almost due east, and makes about a 90° bend and then heads due south. Note, the MW will appear curved wrt the horizon.

A few things:
• It's difficult, or likely not possible, to draw straight-lines to demarcate the APOD image boundaries, so instead, I posted an oversized Stellarium view, including the zenith.
• I labeled Polaris as a reference. The APOD composite does not show Polaris as it's just beyond the left edge (5°) of the APOD, and about 15% down from the top edge. Also, most, it not all, of Cassiopeia is behind the tree at the base of the MW.
• Per David Cruz's imaging steps, the total sequenced exposure time was at least 30 minutes. The process of blending these images into the panorama logically introduces distortion that negates any standard projection simulations within Stellarium:
For this 180° panorama I went with 6 panels for the sky and 6 panels Foreground. For the Sky I shoot for each panel 5x1min tracked exposures to stack them and reduce noise. For the foreground I shoot each panel 4x30s untracked exposures. The sky and foreground were later blended together in editing.
 
MW View - Corrected.jpg
Thanks! Great stuff.
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."