APOD: Rosette Deep Field (2024 Feb 14)

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APOD: Rosette Deep Field (2024 Feb 14)

Post by APOD Robot » Wed Feb 14, 2024 5:05 am

Image Rosette Deep Field

Explanation: Can you find the Rosette Nebula? The large, red, and flowery-looking nebula on the upper left may seem the obvious choice, but that is actually just diffuse hydrogen emission surrounding the Cone and Fox Fur Nebulas. The famous Rosette Nebula is really located on the lower right and connected to the other nebulas by irregular filaments. Because the featured image of Rosetta's field is so wide and deep, it seems to contain other flowers. Designated NGC 2237, the center of the Rosette nebula is populated by the bright blue stars of open cluster NGC 2244, whose winds and energetic light are evacuating the nebula's center. The Rosette Nebula is about 5,000 light years distant and, just by itself, spans about three times the diameter of a full moon. This flowery field can be found toward the constellation of the Unicorn (Monoceros).

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Re: APOD: Rosette Deep Field (2024 Feb 14)

Post by Ann » Wed Feb 14, 2024 8:34 am

Oh boy, this took some time! So where is the "exhausted" emoji?

Anyway...


So I decided to do some more annotations, and I'm going to start with the upper part of the APOD, the Fox Fur and Cone Nebula part of it:

APOD 14 February 2024 upper part annotated.png
The Fox Fur and Cone nebula part of the APOD.

A few notes here. First, you would be tempted to think that the Fox Fur/Cone Nebula complex is actually attached to the Rosette Nebula complex, but that's not the case. The distance to the Rosette Nebula is almost 5,000 light-years, but the distance to the Fox Fur/Cone Nebula complex is less than 3,000 light-years. But as I said, I'll start with the upper part of the APOD.

Here are two closeups of the "Christmas Tree" part of the APOD:

S Mon and Christmas Tree goodastronomy and Steve Timmons.png
I just love the colors here! The Cone Nebula is at top and the Fox Fur
is at lower left. The faint peach-colored patch at upper center
is hidden star formation.Credit: @goodastronomy and Steve Timmons.



I like the picture by Bijan Moravej alahkami too, because it brings out the rich old yellow cluster Trumpler 5. And what about the brilliant closeup of Trumpler 5 by zirl?

Trumpler 5 and red giant HD 260597 zirl.png
Old open cluster Trumpler 5. Credit: zirl.
Ann
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Re: APOD: Rosette Deep Field (2024 Feb 14)

Post by Ann » Wed Feb 14, 2024 8:39 am

I really have no more time, but here is a quickie on the lower part of the APOD, the Rosette Nebula part:

APOD 14 February 2024 lower part annotated.png

What about that huge "cavity" to the upper left of the Rosette Nebula in the APOD? Could it be a supernova remnant? And what about the "blue bubbles" in and near the cavity?

Oh, and yes, I guess the Rosette Nebula is a bit like a rose!


Okay, I'm off...

Ann
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Olivier Bernard

Re: APOD: Rosette Deep Field (2024 Feb 14)

Post by Olivier Bernard » Wed Feb 14, 2024 12:42 pm

Ann thank you! It took only 4h per panel (3) so you see it was not too long :D
The supernova on the left is The supernova remnant SNR G206.9+2.3

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Re: APOD: Rosette Deep Field (2024 Feb 14)

Post by Oliver64 » Wed Feb 14, 2024 1:34 pm

Ann wrote: Wed Feb 14, 2024 8:34 am Oh boy, this took some time! So where is the "exhausted" emoji?

Anyway...


So I decided to do some more annotations, and I'm going to start with the upper part of the APOD, the Fox Fur and Cone Nebula part of it:

APOD 14 February 2024 upper part annotated.png
The Fox Fur and Cone nebula part of the APOD.

A few notes here. First, you would be tempted to think that the Fox Fur/Cone Nebula complex is actually attached to the Rosette Nebula complex, but that's not the case. The distance to the Rosette Nebula is almost 5,000 light-years, but the distance to the Fox Fur/Cone Nebula complex is less than 3,000 light-years. But as I said, I'll start with the upper part of the APOD.

Here are two closeups of the "Christmas Tree" part of the APOD:

S Mon and Christmas Tree goodastronomy and Steve Timmons.png
I just love the colors here! The Cone Nebula is at top and the Fox Fur
is at lower left. The faint peach-colored patch at upper center
is hidden star formation.Credit: @goodastronomy and Steve Timmons.



I like the picture by Bijan Moravej alahkami too, because it brings out the rich old yellow cluster Trumpler 5. And what about the brilliant closeup of Trumpler 5 by zirl?

Trumpler 5 and red giant HD 260597 zirl.png
Old open cluster Trumpler 5. Credit: zirl.
Ann
Ann thank you! It took only 4h per panel (3) so you see it was not too long :D
The supernova on the left is The supernova remnant SNR G206.9+2.3

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Re: APOD: Rosette Deep Field (2024 Feb 14)

Post by johnnydeep » Wed Feb 14, 2024 7:09 pm

Apparently Ann's definition of "I don't have much time" is quite different from my own. 😊💖
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Re: APOD: Rosette Deep Field (2024 Feb 14)

Post by AVAO » Wed Feb 14, 2024 7:12 pm

APOD Robot wrote: Wed Feb 14, 2024 5:05 am Image Rosette Deep Field

Explanation: Can you find the Rosette Nebula? The large, red, and flowery-looking nebula on the upper left may seem the obvious choice, but that is actually just diffuse hydrogen emission surrounding the Cone and Fox Fur Nebulas. The famous Rosette Nebula is really located on the lower right and connected to the other nebulas by irregular filaments. Because the featured image of Rosetta's field is so wide and deep, it seems to contain other flowers. Designated NGC 2237, the center of the Rosette nebula is populated by the bright blue stars of open cluster NGC 2244, whose winds and energetic light are evacuating the nebula's center. The Rosette Nebula is about 5,000 light years distant and, just by itself, spans about three times the diameter of a full moon. This flowery field can be found toward the constellation of the Unicorn (Monoceros).

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ThanX to the creators of this breathtaking panorama. The delicate filament structures and supernova remnants shine in unprecedented detail. Just great, like many other pictures on your astrobin profiles. Congratulations!

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Re: APOD: Rosette Deep Field (2024 Feb 14)

Post by johnnydeep » Wed Feb 14, 2024 7:20 pm

What are the overlapping blue bubbles off to the far left of the "Rosette Nebula" annotation text in the APOD? I don't think they were pointed out by Ann above. (Also, though the astrobin link to the source image might point them out, that link is currently down for me. [ EDIT: nope - they aren't called out in the Astrobin link either. ])

blue bubbles in the rosette nebula complex.jpg
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Re: APOD: Rosette Deep Field (2024 Feb 14)

Post by Ann » Wed Feb 14, 2024 7:44 pm

johnnydeep wrote: Wed Feb 14, 2024 7:20 pm What are the overlapping blue bubbles off to the far left of the "Rosette Nebula" annotation text in the APOD? I don't think they were pointed out by Ann above. (Also, though the astrobin link to the source image might point them out, that link is currently down for me. [ EDIT: nope - they aren't called out in the Astrobin link either. ])

They were (pointed out by me). :wink:


Maybe this "double bubble" is what Olivier Bernhard referred to?
Olivier Bernhard wrote:

The supernova on the left is The supernova remnant SNR G206.9+2.3
Yeah, I guess it was! :D


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Re: APOD: Rosette Deep Field (2024 Feb 14)

Post by johnnydeep » Wed Feb 14, 2024 8:09 pm

Ann wrote: Wed Feb 14, 2024 7:44 pm
johnnydeep wrote: Wed Feb 14, 2024 7:20 pm What are the overlapping blue bubbles off to the far left of the "Rosette Nebula" annotation text in the APOD? I don't think they were pointed out by Ann above. (Also, though the astrobin link to the source image might point them out, that link is currently down for me. [ EDIT: nope - they aren't called out in the Astrobin link either. ])

They were (pointed out by me). :wink:


Maybe this "double bubble" is what Olivier Bernhard referred to?
Olivier Bernhard wrote:

The supernova on the left is The supernova remnant SNR G206.9+2.3
Yeah, I guess it was! :D


Ann
Yup, I missed it. And it was your first image too! Thanks for finding its designation: SNR G206.9+2.3. But there are TWO bubbles. Isn't that
unusual to have been caused by a single supernova? Perhaps the double-ness is explained in one of the research papers I didn't read.
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."{ʲₒʰₙNYᵈₑᵉₚ}

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Re: APOD: Rosette Deep Field (2024 Feb 14)

Post by Ann » Thu Feb 15, 2024 8:15 am

johnnydeep wrote: Wed Feb 14, 2024 8:09 pm
Yup, I missed it. And it was your first image too! Thanks for finding its designation: SNR G206.9+2.3. But there are TWO bubbles. Isn't that
unusual to have been caused by a single supernova? Perhaps the double-ness is explained in one of the research papers I didn't read.
Bubble, bubble, toil and trouble, double bubble!

Pretending to be Neufer here, although he would be so much more precise in his Shakespeare reference!

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Re: APOD: Rosette Deep Field (2024 Feb 14)

Post by johnnydeep » Thu Feb 15, 2024 2:22 pm

Ann wrote: Thu Feb 15, 2024 8:15 am
johnnydeep wrote: Wed Feb 14, 2024 8:09 pm
Yup, I missed it. And it was your first image too! Thanks for finding its designation: SNR G206.9+2.3. But there are TWO bubbles. Isn't that
unusual to have been caused by a single supernova? Perhaps the double-ness is explained in one of the research papers I didn't read.
Bubble, bubble, toil and trouble, double bubble!

Pretending to be Neufer here, although he would be so much more precise in his Shakespeare reference!

Ann
That's a mis-quote, apparently. I didn't realize that, but Neufer no doubt would have. See https://shakespearenerd.home.blog/2019/ ... d-trouble/, and this:
http://shakespeare.mit.edu/macbeth/macbeth.4.1.html wrote: The Tragedy of Macbeth - Act 4, Scene 1

SCENE I. A cavern. In the middle, a boiling cauldron.

Thunder. Enter the three Witches

First Witch
Thrice the brinded cat hath mew'd.

Second Witch

Thrice and once the hedge-pig whined.

Third Witch
Harpier cries 'Tis time, 'tis time.

First Witch
Round about the cauldron go;
In the poison'd entrails throw.
Toad, that under cold stone
Days and nights has thirty-one
Swelter'd venom sleeping got,
Boil thou first i' the charmed pot.

ALL
Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."{ʲₒʰₙNYᵈₑᵉₚ}