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evawillms
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I have a question

Post by evawillms » Wed Apr 03, 2024 3:37 am

Does the nebula from which the sun emerged still exist?Run 3

Even if the nebula has been dispersed, there would still exist highly detectable traces of the emission cloud would there not?

I have often wondered what the sky would look like to a person in a star cluster... Are the stars close enough together that it would never really get dark at night? (supposing a planet, which rotates so as to provide a night and day to its inhabitants) Would one see the other stars also during the day?

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Chris Peterson
Abominable Snowman
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Re: I have a question

Post by Chris Peterson » Wed Apr 03, 2024 5:22 am

evawillms wrote: Wed Apr 03, 2024 3:37 am Does the nebula from which the sun emerged still exist?Run 3

Even if the nebula has been dispersed, there would still exist highly detectable traces of the emission cloud would there not?
No, it no longer exists at all. It's material ended up in the Sun and in the other bodies that make up the Solar System. Anything not incorporated would have been blown away by the early Sun billions of years ago.
I have often wondered what the sky would look like to a person in a star cluster... Are the stars close enough together that it would never really get dark at night? (supposing a planet, which rotates so as to provide a night and day to its inhabitants) Would one see the other stars also during the day?
The nights would still be many times dimmer than the days, but much brighter than our night skies. There would be many stars brighter than Venus appears to us, and Venus is visible in full daylight. So yes, you'd be able to see stars in the day. But I doubt many would be very prominent. You'd have to kind of look for them.
Chris

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Chris L Peterson
Cloudbait Observatory
https://www.cloudbait.com

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Rauf
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Re: I have a question

Post by Rauf » Thu Apr 04, 2024 10:14 am

Chris Peterson wrote: Wed Apr 03, 2024 5:22 am
evawillms wrote: Wed Apr 03, 2024 3:37 am Does the nebula from which the sun emerged still exist?Run 3

Even if the nebula has been dispersed, there would still exist highly detectable traces of the emission cloud would there not?
No, it no longer exists at all. It's material ended up in the Sun and in the other bodies that make up the Solar System. Anything not incorporated would have been blown away by the early Sun billions of years ago.
I have often wondered what the sky would look like to a person in a star cluster... Are the stars close enough together that it would never really get dark at night? (supposing a planet, which rotates so as to provide a night and day to its inhabitants) Would one see the other stars also during the day?
The nights would still be many times dimmer than the days, but much brighter than our night skies. There would be many stars brighter than Venus appears to us, and Venus is visible in full daylight. So yes, you'd be able to see stars in the day. But I doubt many would be very prominent. You'd have to kind of look for them.
I have often wondered whether it is possible for a planet to never experience true night if it exists within a triple star system. I am also curious about the potential for life to exist under such conditions.

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Chris Peterson
Abominable Snowman
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Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2007 11:13 pm
Location: Guffey, Colorado, USA

Re: I have a question

Post by Chris Peterson » Thu Apr 04, 2024 1:23 pm

Rauf wrote: Thu Apr 04, 2024 10:14 am
Chris Peterson wrote: Wed Apr 03, 2024 5:22 am
evawillms wrote: Wed Apr 03, 2024 3:37 am Does the nebula from which the sun emerged still exist?Run 3

Even if the nebula has been dispersed, there would still exist highly detectable traces of the emission cloud would there not?
No, it no longer exists at all. It's material ended up in the Sun and in the other bodies that make up the Solar System. Anything not incorporated would have been blown away by the early Sun billions of years ago.
I have often wondered what the sky would look like to a person in a star cluster... Are the stars close enough together that it would never really get dark at night? (supposing a planet, which rotates so as to provide a night and day to its inhabitants) Would one see the other stars also during the day?
The nights would still be many times dimmer than the days, but much brighter than our night skies. There would be many stars brighter than Venus appears to us, and Venus is visible in full daylight. So yes, you'd be able to see stars in the day. But I doubt many would be very prominent. You'd have to kind of look for them.
I have often wondered whether it is possible for a planet to never experience true night if it exists within a triple star system. I am also curious about the potential for life to exist under such conditions.
The only likely stable triple star systems have one pair of stars orbiting each other closely, and the third orbiting that pair at a large distance. A planet could possibly support life on that outer star.
Chris

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Chris L Peterson
Cloudbait Observatory
https://www.cloudbait.com